RxJS Observable Pipe, Subscribe, Map and Filter Examples with Angular 9/8

  • Author: Techiediaries Team

In this tutorial we'll learn by example to use the RxJS' pipe() function, the map() and filter() operators in Angular 9. And how to use the subscribe() method to subscribe to Observables.

RxJS' pipe() is both a standalone function and a method on the Observable interface that can be used to combine multiple RxJS operators to compose asynchronous operations.

The pipe() function takes one or more operators and returns an RxJS Observable.

pipe() takes a bunch of RxJS operators as arguments such as filter and mapseparated by comma and run them in the sequence they are added and finally returns an RxJS Observable. To get the result we need to subscribe() to the returned Observable.

Note: pipe() is a function/method that is used to chain multiple RxJS operators while map() and filter() are operators that operate and transform the values of an Observable (sequence of values). They are similar to the map() and filter() methods of JavaScript arrays.

Let's see this by example.

First, let's add the following imports:

import { of, Observable } from 'rxjs';
import { filter, map } from 'rxjs/operators'; 

Next, we need to create an Observable using the of() function from a sequence of 1 to 10 numbers and use the pipe() method to apply the filter() operator on the sequence:

const ob$: Observable<number> = of(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10).pipe(filter( v => v % 2 === 0));

The filter() operator filters the seqeunce and returns a new sequence of the values that verify the v => v % 2 === 0 predicate i.e only even numbers.

Finally, let's run this by subscribing to the returned Observable:

ob$.subscribe(
  next => console.log('next:', next),
  err => console.log('error:', err),
  () => console.log('Completed'),
);

This is the output: next: 2 next: 4 next: 6 next: 8 next: 10 Completed

Next, let's apply the map() operator to the sequence as follows:

const ob$: Observable<number> = of(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10).pipe(filter( v => v % 2 === 0), map( v => v * 10));

We apply both the filter() and map() operators, filter() will be executed first then map(). This will produce the following output:

next: 20
next: 40
next: 60
next: 80
next: 100
Completed

map() transforms each value of the source Observable using the passed formula. In our case, v => v * 10 i.e it multiplies each value by ten.

Angular 9 Example with RxJS' pipe(), map() and filter()

Let's now see how to use pipe(), map() and filter() in real Angular 9 use case.

Let's start by genrating a new Angular service using the following command:

$ ng g service country

Next, open the src/app/country.service.ts file and add the following imports:



Get our books

DMCA.com Protection Status